About LASIK & Refractive Surgery
at Hudson Eye Physicians
& Surgeons, LLC

LASIK and PRK Surgeries

LASIK is a form of laser vision correction surgery which eliminates the need for glasses and contact lenses in most patients, including patients with astigmatism. LASIK has been performed for over 20 years across the U.S. and the rest of the world, and numerous clinical studies and surveys demonstrated a high rate of satisfaction among patients.

In the early days of LASIK, a microkeratome blade created the incision in the cornea to create the flap. Most refractive surgeons have transitioned to bladeless LASIK. Instead of a microkeratome, a much more precise femtosecond laser creates the corneal flap. The flap is then lifted to expose the underlying corneal layers, or the stroma. Subsequently, the excimer laser precisely reshapes the surface of the cornea. The flap is then put back in place to cover the exposed cornea.

LASIK is a well tolerated procedure, with very little discomfort and fast recovery. Patients can typically return back to work after a brief exam the next day.

At this time, LASIK does not eliminate the need for reading glasses resulting from presbyopia. Presbyopia is a normal part of aging and makes it difficult to focus on near objects. It requires reading glasses for near vision. It usually starts in the mid 40s regardless of whether someone underwent LASIK or not.

To qualify for the procedure, the patients must be at least 18 years old and have a stable prescription in their glasses or contact lenses for at least 1 year. The cornea must also have adequate thickness, especially in patients with very strong prescriptions. Patients with certain corneal dystrophies, such as recurrent corneal erosions, or significant dry eye may not be good candidates for LASIK. Patients with keratoconus or suspected of early keratoconus should not undergo LASIK. After a period of time, a small portion of patients may regress and may need a mild pair of prescription glasses or laser enhancement.

Book a LASIK consult today with the skilled ophthalmologists in our Bayonne, Jersey City, or Millburn, NJ office.

PRK

PRK is a form of laser vision correction surgery which eliminates the need for glasses and contact lenses in most patients, including patients with astigmatism. Similarly to LASIK, it has been performed for over 20 years across the U.S. and the rest of the world, and numerous clinical studies and surveys demonstrated a high rate of satisfaction among patients.

Similarly to LASIK, to qualify for PRK, the patients must be at least 18 years old and have a stable prescription in their glasses or contact lenses for at least 1 year. PRK is usually performed in cases where the cornea does not have adequate thickness to safely perform LASIK. Also, patients with recurrent corneal erosions who do not qualify for LASIK can be treated with PRK. The final visual outcomes and satisfaction rates are very similar to LASIK. Patients with keratoconus or suspected of early keratoconus should not undergo PRK. After a period of time, a small portion of patients may regress and may need a mild pair of prescription glasses or laser enhancement.

Book a PRK consult today with one of the HEPS ophthalmologists at our Bayonne, Jersey City, or Millburn, NJ offices.

Alternatives to LASIK and PRK

Phakic Intraocular Lens Implants – ICL

Patients with high myopia (strong minus prescription) who do not qualify for LASIK or PRK laser surgery may qualify for phakic intraocular lens implants. We offer Visian ICL implants from Staar Surgical®. These lenses are surgically implanted into the eye and are positioned behind the iris and in front of the natural lens. They eliminate the need for glasses or contact lenses, or greatly reduce their power.

Reading Vision Correction – Presbyopia Correction

The natural lens inside the human eye has the ability to adjust focus from distant to near objects, a process known as accommodation. This is accomplished by contraction and relaxation of the ciliary muscle inside the eye. The natural lens becomes thinner or thicker and this allows it to focus at different distances. Unfortunately, humans start losing this ability to change focus in their 40s. This results in difficulty focusing on near objects, and in practical terms, it translates to difficulty reading small print. The simple solution to this problem is reading glasses, however, the KAMRA inlay offers the ability to focus on near objects without glasses.

KAMRA Inlay

KAMRA and Raindrop are corneal inlays which are surgically implanted into the cornea. The KAMRA inlay is implanted in the cornea of the nondominant eye only, and increases its depth of focus. It is a thin, opaque ring with a central opening and can be thought of as a contact lens permanently implanted between the layers of the cornea. It is similar to the aperture in a photo camera or a pinhole. As a result, the amount of light entering the eye is reduced, but the depth of focus is increased which results in distant, intermediate, and near objects to all be in focus at the same time. The dominant eye remains unaltered and retains distance vision only. The side effects of the KAMRA inlay may include difficulties with contrast sensitivity, problems with night vision, double vision, ghost images, glare, halos, and color disturbances.

Book a consult with our skilled ophthalmologists to see which vision correction surgery is right for you. We have offices in Jersey City, Bayonne, and Millburn, NJ.